How Americans remember Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Tomorrow marks the 70th anniversary of the date the United States government/military dropped two atomic bombs on the Japanese towns of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  More than one hundred thousand people were killed in these bombings.  The vast majority of those killed in the bombings were civilians, including women and children.  Read that again: we dropped nuclear bombs on targets that included many innocent women and children.

In Hiroshima alone, “Some 70,000–80,000 people, of whom 20,000 were soldiers, or around 30% of the population of Hiroshima, were killed by the blast and resultant firestorm, and another 70,000 injured.” [Wikipedia]

In 1995, The Smithsonian Museum was unable to open an exhibit that intended to portray the events evenly, not merely discussing the men who flew the bomber and how it ended WWII, but actually presenting artifacts and images of the victims, many of whom were children, and non-military men and women.  Some people did not want the whole story, the entire narrative, to be told.  Think about that.

https://youtu.be/XMsg6I4rKSY

I’d just like to remind you all that there are certain narratives that we like to hold onto as Americans for sentimental or patriotic or other reasons that severely and detrimentally ignore or deny uncomfortable truths.  Many Americans seem to have a selective memory one might say.

Most people are comfortable with the common narrative: “America stopped Hitler by dropping “the bomb,”” and most are more than happy to let the story end there.  But such ignorance (voluntary or not) does a tremendous damage to the truth, and does not properly inform our current historical context as to how, when, or why certain military actions ought to be conducted, or not.

There are many such narratives alive and well in this country.  Narratives that shield us from uncomfortable truths.  Inform yourself, my friends.  Uncomfortable or not, truth is truth.

Let’s not forget the all-too-true maxim: “history is written by the victors.”

800px-Nagasaki_1945_-_Before_and_after_(adjusted)
(caption: Nagasaki before and after the bomb.)

“…and no one’s sure how all of this [war] got started, but we’re gonna make ‘em G**-damned certain how it’s gonna end…”

~ Bright Eyes “Road to Joy”

Lord have mercy.

“I tremble in fear for my country when I reflect that God is just…”  ~ Thomas Jefferson

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An Open Question for Christians

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When is the Christian community going to stand together and make a commitment to homeschool all our children? 

For too long Christian families have willingly handed their children over to the hands of the State (into the hands of moral strangers) for seven hours a day, five days a week, ten months a year.  Think about that.  Handing your kids over to a social system designed to create non-Christians.

Gone are the days where the public school system upheld anything remotely Christian in ethics or values.  Currently (except for a few classrooms here and there) what is presented as education is secular, liberal indoctrination.  Anti-Christian thought paraded as fact and “science” all day long.

Christian perspectives are not only dismissed as myth and superstition, but they’re openly mocked and berated.  What child could withstand that moral and intellectual assault for four years, let alone twelve?

For how much longer are Christians going to subject our children to the diabolical machine of public education? 
Are you willing to make the commitment and sacrifices necessary to homeschool your children?

(Your thoughts, comments, opinions, questions are welcomed)

To confuse teaching with learning…

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” Many students, especially those who are poor, intuitively know what the schools do for them. They school them to confuse process and substance. Once these become blurred, a new logic is assumed: the more treatment there is, the better are the results; or, escalation leads to success. The pupil is thereby “schooled” to confuse teaching with learning, grade advancement with education, a diploma with competence, and fluency with the ability to say something new. His imagination is “schooled” to accept service in place of value. Medical treatment is mistaken for health care, social work for the improvement of community life, police protection for safety, military poise for national security, the rat race for productive work. Health, learning, dignity, independence, and creative endeavour are defined as little more than the performance of the institutions which claim to serve these ends, and their improvement is made to depend on allocating more resources to the management of hospitals, schools, and other agencies in question. ”

Ivan Illich, Deschooling Society (1973: 9)

Make the Ordinary Come Alive

Make the Ordinary Come Alive

Do not ask your children
to strive for extraordinary lives.
Such striving may seem admirable,
but it is a way of foolishness.
Help them instead to find the wonder
and the marvel of an ordinary life.
Show them the joy of tasting
tomatoes, apples, and pears.
Show them how to cry
when pets and people die.
Show them the infinite pleasure
in the touch of a hand.
And make the ordinary come alive for them.
The extraordinary will take care of itself.

By William Martin

By faith make me well…

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For she said, “If I touch even his garments, I shall be made well.” And immediately the hemorrhage ceased; and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease. And Jesus, perceiving in himself that power had gone forth from him, immediately turned about in the crowd, and said, “Who touched my garments?” And his disciples said to him, “You see the crowd pressing around you, and yet you say, ‘Who touched me?'” And he looked around to see who had done it. But the woman, knowing what had been done to her, came in fear and trembling and fell down before him, and told him the whole truth. And he said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.”

– Mark 5

O Holy One, visit and heal our infirmities for Your name’s sake.